What happened? Two babies happened. We are so happy for them, they really light up our days (and night!) They are God sent gift and we couldn’t be more grateful. Moving on, I have received so many emails from blogger friends and fellow Indonesian Chinese cuisine lovers and I must admit that I have not been cooking at all aside from blending mushy food for the babies. It is so easy – they never complain. But of course it would not be forever. I am contemplating on learning cooking Japanese food for them because it seems easy? It seems that way. Any thought?

Moving on to cooking. This pork dish is my favorite. Only a handful of restaurants serve it and then it is not always available. Mother always claims it is so easy to cook. But yeah, she never does until one day she decided it is time to teach me how to. It is so delicious, the gelatinous part of the trotter, the sweet sour and spicy sauce. It is basically a one dish meal.

We got one kg of pig trotter and cut into chunk sizes. Bone, skin, fat and all. Not a fan of anything relating to feet? Get pork belly or something like that. That would be a great substitute. Rub some coarse salt on the meat and rinse thoroughly with cold water.

Boil a big pot of water and add the chunks of meat into the boiling water. Blanch for 2-3 minutes and remove. Set aside for later use.

Prep ingredients for the dish. Some chili sauce, tomato sauce, shallots, garlic, bird’s eye chills, fresh tomatoes and tauco (or douchi, fermented and salted soy bean). The chili paste we used was homemade. We blended 200 g of red chili in a blender by adding a little bit of water. If you want the chili sauce to be not too spicy, get rid off the seeds before blending.

Combine fermented soy beans, garlic and shallot in a blender.

Blend till medium fine.

Heat some cooking oil in a thick based wok.

Stir-fry the tauco paste till fragrant, about 3-4 minutes over high heat, till it bubbles.

Don’t forget to stir quickly to avoid burning.

This is another ingredient that I forgot to include in the top image. The Chinese dark soy sauce is used, kecap manis (Indonesian sweet soy sauce) can be used as substitute, but it is really not the same.

Also cut up the tomatoes.

Back to stir-frying the paste. Keep stirring until the paste thickened.

Add chili paste into the wok. Lower the heat to medium at this point.

Stir-fry until the paste all blended, about 2 minutes.

Add tomato wedges into the wok. Cook till the tomatoes softened, sabot 3-5 minutes over medium heat.

Add the pork into the wok. That kinda rhymes.

Season with dark soy sauce.

A tablespoon of sugar. Or more if you wish.

Some tomato sauce. We used almost half a bottle of tomato sauce.

Stir well until all ingredients combined. Cook over high heat.

Lastly, add bird’s eye chili.

And some hot water.

Lastly, season with salt.

Cook until the sauce boiled up. Remove the dish to a non reactive pan.

Simmer over really low heat for 30-45 minutes. Serve piping hot over steamed rice.

Print

Pig trotters in tomato sauce

Makes 4 servings

Ingredients:

1 kg pig trotters or pork belly, cut into large chunks
15 shallots
5 cloves garlic
2 tbsp fermented and salted soy bean (taocho)
200 g red chili paste
1/2 cup cooking oil
3 tomatoes, cut into wedges
2 tbsp dark soy sauce
1 tbsp sugar
1/2 tbsp salt
1 cup hot water

Directions:

Blend shallots, garlic and taoco into thick paste in a blender.
Heat cooking oil in a wok. Stir fry paste over high heat for 3-4 minutes, until the paste thickened.
Add chili paste and stir-fry for another 2 minutes. Add tomato wedges and cook for another minute.
Add chunks of meat into the wok.
Season with dark soy sauce, sugar, and salt. Stir until combined.
Cook over medium heat until boiling.
Remove from wok and put into pot.
Simmer over low heat for 45 minutes.
Serve hot with steamed rice.

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6 Responses to “Pig trotters in tomato sauce”

  1. 1

    Ling — April 23, 2014 @ 3:07 pm

    Finally, I saw something new in your link. I’m kindly exciting about your website. Please make more food for us to learn. I’m really appreciate that.
    Thanks a lot.

  2. 2

    HL — April 25, 2014 @ 2:42 am

    Halo there, welcome back and congrats on your babies! Is it possible for me to substitute the trotters with other parts such as ribs instead?

    • Jun replied: — May 1st, 2014 @ 11:09 pm

      Thank you! Pork ribs would be great substitute!

  3. 3

    Gertrude — May 5, 2014 @ 8:48 am

    Welcome back Jun and congratulations!!! Miss coming to your blog. Have two kids can be a handful but hope to see more posting from you. My mom like cooking with trotters but never with tomatoes. She usually cook it in soy sauce.

  4. 4

    Esef — May 15, 2014 @ 8:14 am

    Congratulations to you and babies! They sure proud to have beautiful mom who is a great cook! :-)

    With my son, towards the weaning stage, I started with rice porridge mixed with grounded fried anchovies (after soaking, dried and toast in the oven until crispy without oil). Then I added shredded Amaranth leaves (Horenso), Chinese spinach ( Sayur Bayam), Broccoli, carrot, potatoes, followed by minced meat. Also, I gave baby oats and quinoa. Yes, I cooked Japanese food like Miso and tofu, chawan mushi, seaweed paste. I can go on and on … Actually, I let my son tasted what we adults ate. He likes briyani rice, korma, Nigiri sushi, gobo, broccoli soup, etc.

    Most of all, take it easy and slowly introduce new food to them. I didn’t follow the food guide to the dot but if a baby willing to try something new, why not? Not all babies are the same… :-)

  5. 5

    Linda — June 26, 2014 @ 1:05 am

    Congrats on your new baby!! I have been waiting for your new post and got really excited when I see that you post some new recipe!

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